MAKE UP YOUR OWN MIND FOR ONCE...

11th May 2013

Video reblogged from CockOnAHotTinRoof with 296 notes

johnboysawyer:

backdoor teen mom (watch it now before they take it down!)

18th March 2012

Photo reblogged from The Daily What with 11,204 notes

thedailywhat:

Human-Sized Bird’s Nest of the Day: The Giant Birdsnest from O*GE was designed to be a multi-purpose creativity space for “creating new ideas.”
Part furniture, part playground, the inspiration incubator comfortably seats 16 and “needs no explanation or user manual”: Do whatever you want inside, just clean up after you’re done.
[gizmodo.]

thedailywhat:

Human-Sized Bird’s Nest of the Day: The Giant Birdsnest from O*GE was designed to be a multi-purpose creativity space for “creating new ideas.”

Part furniture, part playground, the inspiration incubator comfortably seats 16 and “needs no explanation or user manual”: Do whatever you want inside, just clean up after you’re done.

[gizmodo.]

15th March 2012

Photo reblogged from The Daily Doodles with 1,380 notes

thedailydoodles:

“The Old Mix Tape”
Listening to his old mix tape that he found in a shoebox full of junk from high school, Henry Singleton remembers how much time he spent meticulously pausing and stopping the cassette player/recorder as he constructed the perfect mix for himself or his friends…
It was something that he used to do practically every week back then, but he had almost forgot about the time consuming activity entirely until he saw the tape.  
Each song unleashes forgotten memories associated with that age— not all bad, of course; Henry just feels odd to be back in that young mindset, thinking the dumb thoughts he used to think all the way back then.   
The problems and worries he remembers seem to match the music: immature, embarrassing even.  Henry wishes the him of 15 years ago was cooler, but sadly that’s not the case.  The music is awful.
He wonders if he should throw the tape out after he listens to it, to destroy any record of his lack of good taste…
In the misty haze of nostalgic idealization, Henry decides that mix tapes were more intimate… It took real time to make each mix, after all, so it meant something dammit!  And this was before every song ever made was available to download and listen to within moments.
However, he realizes, it IS pretty awesome to have every song ever made available to download and listen to within moments, so… he’s not sure if “intimate” is better or worse.  Or if it even matters. 
It’s just different, is all.
Henry then hits the record button and tapes over all of his old songs with the dead air around him, erasing any evidence of the bad music he used to like.
Posted 3/14/2012
Wanna star in your very own Daily Doodle?  CLICK HERE!FAQ  TWITTER  FACEBOOK
CLICK HERE to read Yesterday’s Doodle!

thedailydoodles:

“The Old Mix Tape”

Listening to his old mix tape that he found in a shoebox full of junk from high school, Henry Singleton remembers how much time he spent meticulously pausing and stopping the cassette player/recorder as he constructed the perfect mix for himself or his friends…

It was something that he used to do practically every week back then, but he had almost forgot about the time consuming activity entirely until he saw the tape.  

Each song unleashes forgotten memories associated with that age— not all bad, of course; Henry just feels odd to be back in that young mindset, thinking the dumb thoughts he used to think all the way back then.   

The problems and worries he remembers seem to match the music: immature, embarrassing even.  Henry wishes the him of 15 years ago was cooler, but sadly that’s not the case.  The music is awful.

He wonders if he should throw the tape out after he listens to it, to destroy any record of his lack of good taste…

In the misty haze of nostalgic idealization, Henry decides that mix tapes were more intimate… It took real time to make each mix, after all, so it meant something dammit!  And this was before every song ever made was available to download and listen to within moments.

However, he realizes, it IS pretty awesome to have every song ever made available to download and listen to within moments, so… he’s not sure if “intimate” is better or worse.  Or if it even matters. 

It’s just different, is all.

Henry then hits the record button and tapes over all of his old songs with the dead air around him, erasing any evidence of the bad music he used to like.

Posted 3/14/2012

Wanna star in your very own Daily Doodle?  CLICK HERE!
FAQ  TWITTER  FACEBOOK

CLICK HERE to read Yesterday’s Doodle!

15th March 2012

Link reblogged from I SUCK AT TITLES with 1 note

Stylized Crack Babies and Bacon Strips: Change is Coming, with Kony →

notsosacredcow:

Joseph Kony is a great man. He takes under-privileged Ugandan children and puts them back to work. He teaches these children the value of a dollar, and all the 4/20 pot-smoking, Dorito-eating hippies from California are afraid of the change that’s coming with the uprising of an army of…

10th March 2012

Photo reblogged from Cacophony with 1,339 notes

logicianmagician:

Will People Alive Today Have The Opportunity To Upload Their Consciousness To A New Robotic Body?

At the recent Global Future 2045 International Congress held in Moscow, 31-year-old media mogul Dmitry Itskov told attendees how he plans to create exactly that kind of immortality, first by creating a robot controlled by the human brain, then by actually transplanting a human brain into a humanoid robot, and then by replacing the surgical transplant with a method for simply uploading a person’s consciousness into a surrogate ‘bot. He thinks he can get beyond the first phase—to transplanting a working brain into a robot—in just ten years, putting him on course to achieve his ultimate goal—human consciousness completely disembodied and placed within a holographic host—within 30 years time. 

logicianmagician:

Will People Alive Today Have The Opportunity To Upload Their Consciousness To A New Robotic Body?

At the recent Global Future 2045 International Congress held in Moscow, 31-year-old media mogul Dmitry Itskov told attendees how he plans to create exactly that kind of immortality, first by creating a robot controlled by the human brain, then by actually transplanting a human brain into a humanoid robot, and then by replacing the surgical transplant with a method for simply uploading a person’s consciousness into a surrogate ‘bot. He thinks he can get beyond the first phase—to transplanting a working brain into a robot—in just ten years, putting him on course to achieve his ultimate goal—human consciousness completely disembodied and placed within a holographic host—within 30 years time. 

10th March 2012

Photo reblogged from Quarks to Quasars with 1,638 notes

expose-the-light:

Top Ten Myths About the Brain
When it comes to this complex, mysterious, fascinating organ, what do—and don’t—we know?
By Laura Helmuth
1. We use only 10 percent of our brains. This one sounds so compelling—a precise number, repeated in pop culture for a century, implying that we have huge reserves of untapped mental powers. But the supposedly unused 90 percent of the brain is not some vestigial appendix. Brains are expensive—it takes a lot of energy to build brains during fetal and childhood development and maintain them in adults. Evolutionarily, it would make no sense to carry around surplus brain tissue. Experiments using PET or fMRI scans show that much of the brain is engaged even during simple tasks, and injury to even a small bit of brain can have profound consequences for language, sensory perception, movement or emotion.
2. “Flashbulb memories” are precise, detailed and persistent. We all have memories that feel as vivid and accurate as a snapshot, usually of some shocking, dramatic event—the assassination of President Kennedy, the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, the attacks of September 11, 2001. People remember exactly where they were, what they were doing, who they were with, what they saw or heard. But several clever experiments have tested people’s memory immediately after a tragedy and again several months or years later. 
3. It’s all downhill after 40 (or 50 or 60 or 70). It’s true, some cognitive skills do decline as you get older. Children are better at learning new languages than adults—and never play a game of concentration against a 10-year-old unless you’re prepared to be humiliated. Young adults are faster than older adults to judge whether two objects are the same or different; they can more easily memorize a list of random words, and they are faster to count backward by sevens.
But plenty of mental skills improve with age. Vocabulary, for instance—older people know more words and understand subtle linguistic distinctions. Given a biographical sketch of a stranger, they’re better judges of character. They score higher on tests of social wisdom, such as how to settle a conflict. And people get better and better over time at regulating their own emotions and finding meaning in their lives.
4. We have five senses. Sure, sight, smell, hearing, taste and touch are the big ones. But we have many other ways of sensing the world and our place in it. Proprioception is a sense of how our bodies are positioned. Nociception is a sense of pain. We also have a sense of balance—the inner ear is to this sense as the eye is to vision—as well as a sense of body temperature, acceleration and the passage of time.
5. Brains are like computers. We speak of the brain’s processing speed, its storage capacity, its parallel circuits, inputs and outputs. The metaphor fails at pretty much every level: the brain doesn’t have a set memory capacity that is waiting to be filled up; it doesn’t perform computations in the way a computer does; and even basic visual perception isn’t a passive receiving of inputs because we actively interpret, anticipate and pay attention to different elements of the visual world.
6. The brain is hard-wired. This is one of the most enduring legacies of the old “brains are electrical circuits” metaphor.
But one of the biggest discoveries in neuroscience in the past few decades is that the brain is remarkably plastic. In blind people, parts of the brain that normally process sight are instead devoted to hearing. Someone practicing a new skill, like learning to play the violin, “rewires” parts of the brain that are responsible for fine motor control. People with brain injuries can recruit other parts of the brain to compensate for the lost tissue.
7. A conk on the head can cause amnesia. Next to babies switched at birth, this is a favorite trope of soap operas: Someone is in a tragic accident and wakes up in the hospital unable to recognize loved ones or remember his or her own name or history. (The only cure for this form of amnesia, of course, is another conk on the head.)
8. We know what will make us happy. In some cases we haven’t a clue. We routinely overestimate how happy something will make us, whether it’s a birthday, free pizza, a new car, a victory for our favorite sports team or political candidate, winning the lottery or raising children. Money does make people happier, but only to a point—poor people are less happy than the middle class, but the middle class are just as happy as the rich. We overestimate the pleasures of solitude and leisure and underestimate how much happiness we get from social relationships.
9. We see the world as it is. We are not passive recipients of external information that enters our brain through our sensory organs. Instead, we actively search for patterns (like a Dalmatian dog that suddenly appears in a field of black and white dots), turn ambiguous scenes into ones that fit our expectations (it’s a vase; it’s a face) and completely miss details we aren’t expecting. In one famous psychology experiment, about half of all viewers told to count the number of times a group of people pass a basketball do not notice that a guy in a gorilla suit is hulking around among the ball-throwers.
10. Men are from Mars, women are from Venus. Some of the sloppiest, shoddiest, most biased, least reproducible, worst designed and most overinterpreted research in the history of science purports to provide biological explanations for differences between men and women. Eminent neuroscientists once claimed that head size, spinal ganglia or brain stem structures were responsible for women’s inability to think creatively, vote logically or practice medicine. Today the theories are a bit more sophisticated: men supposedly have more specialized brain hemispheres, women more elaborate emotion circuits. Though there are some differences (minor and uncorrelated with any particular ability) between male and female brains, the main problem with looking for correlations with behavior is that sex differences in cognition are massively exaggerated.

expose-the-light:

Top Ten Myths About the Brain

When it comes to this complex, mysterious, fascinating organ, what do—and don’t—we know?

By Laura Helmuth

1. We use only 10 percent of our brains.
This one sounds so compelling—a precise number, repeated in pop culture for a century, implying that we have huge reserves of untapped mental powers. But the supposedly unused 90 percent of the brain is not some vestigial appendix. Brains are expensive—it takes a lot of energy to build brains during fetal and childhood development and maintain them in adults. Evolutionarily, it would make no sense to carry around surplus brain tissue. Experiments using PET or fMRI scans show that much of the brain is engaged even during simple tasks, and injury to even a small bit of brain can have profound consequences for language, sensory perception, movement or emotion.

2. “Flashbulb memories” are precise, detailed and persistent.
We all have memories that feel as vivid and accurate as a snapshot, usually of some shocking, dramatic event—the assassination of President Kennedy, the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, the attacks of September 11, 2001. People remember exactly where they were, what they were doing, who they were with, what they saw or heard. But several clever experiments have tested people’s memory immediately after a tragedy and again several months or years later. 

3. It’s all downhill after 40 (or 50 or 60 or 70).
It’s true, some cognitive skills do decline as you get older. Children are better at learning new languages than adults—and never play a game of concentration against a 10-year-old unless you’re prepared to be humiliated. Young adults are faster than older adults to judge whether two objects are the same or different; they can more easily memorize a list of random words, and they are faster to count backward by sevens.

But plenty of mental skills improve with age. Vocabulary, for instance—older people know more words and understand subtle linguistic distinctions. Given a biographical sketch of a stranger, they’re better judges of character. They score higher on tests of social wisdom, such as how to settle a conflict. And people get better and better over time at regulating their own emotions and finding meaning in their lives.

4. We have five senses.
Sure, sight, smell, hearing, taste and touch are the big ones. But we have many other ways of sensing the world and our place in it. Proprioception is a sense of how our bodies are positioned. Nociception is a sense of pain. We also have a sense of balance—the inner ear is to this sense as the eye is to vision—as well as a sense of body temperature, acceleration and the passage of time.

5. Brains are like computers.
We speak of the brain’s processing speed, its storage capacity, its parallel circuits, inputs and outputs. The metaphor fails at pretty much every level: the brain doesn’t have a set memory capacity that is waiting to be filled up; it doesn’t perform computations in the way a computer does; and even basic visual perception isn’t a passive receiving of inputs because we actively interpret, anticipate and pay attention to different elements of the visual world.

6. The brain is hard-wired.
This is one of the most enduring legacies of the old “brains are electrical circuits” metaphor.

But one of the biggest discoveries in neuroscience in the past few decades is that the brain is remarkably plastic. In blind people, parts of the brain that normally process sight are instead devoted to hearing. Someone practicing a new skill, like learning to play the violin, “rewires” parts of the brain that are responsible for fine motor control. People with brain injuries can recruit other parts of the brain to compensate for the lost tissue.

7. A conk on the head can cause amnesia.
Next to babies switched at birth, this is a favorite trope of soap operas: Someone is in a tragic accident and wakes up in the hospital unable to recognize loved ones or remember his or her own name or history. (The only cure for this form of amnesia, of course, is another conk on the head.)

8. We know what will make us happy.
In some cases we haven’t a clue. We routinely overestimate how happy something will make us, whether it’s a birthday, free pizza, a new car, a victory for our favorite sports team or political candidate, winning the lottery or raising children. Money does make people happier, but only to a point—poor people are less happy than the middle class, but the middle class are just as happy as the rich. We overestimate the pleasures of solitude and leisure and underestimate how much happiness we get from social relationships.

9. We see the world as it is.
We are not passive recipients of external information that enters our brain through our sensory organs. Instead, we actively search for patterns (like a Dalmatian dog that suddenly appears in a field of black and white dots), turn ambiguous scenes into ones that fit our expectations (it’s a vase; it’s a face) and completely miss details we aren’t expecting. In one famous psychology experiment, about half of all viewers told to count the number of times a group of people pass a basketball do not notice that a guy in a gorilla suit is hulking around among the ball-throwers.

10. Men are from Mars, women are from Venus.
Some of the sloppiest, shoddiest, most biased, least reproducible, worst designed and most overinterpreted research in the history of science purports to provide biological explanations for differences between men and women. Eminent neuroscientists once claimed that head size, spinal ganglia or brain stem structures were responsible for women’s inability to think creatively, vote logically or practice medicine. Today the theories are a bit more sophisticated: men supposedly have more specialized brain hemispheres, women more elaborate emotion circuits. Though there are some differences (minor and uncorrelated with any particular ability) between male and female brains, the main problem with looking for correlations with behavior is that sex differences in cognition are massively exaggerated.

10th March 2012

Photo reblogged from GENETICIST with 8,733 notes

geneticist:

Osmia Avosetta are solitary bees that build their nests by biting petals off of flowers, flying them back one by one, and gluing them together often using nectar as glue. Each nest is a papermache work of art that houses a single bee egg. (via)

geneticist:

Osmia Avosetta are solitary bees that build their nests by biting petals off of flowers, flying them back one by one, and gluing them together often using nectar as glue. Each nest is a papermache work of art that houses a single bee egg. (via)

10th March 2012

Photoset reblogged from Wildlife Collective with 2,238 notes

wildlifecollective:

Barreleye
Macropinna microstoma

February 23, 2009—With a head like a fighter-plane cockpit, a Pacific barreleye fish shows off its highly sensitive, barrel-like eyes—topped by green, orblike lenses—in a picture released today but taken in 2004.  The fish, discovered alive in the deep water off California’s central coast by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), is the first specimen of its kind to be found with its soft transparent dome intact.   The 6-inch (15-centimeter) barreleye (Macropinna microstoma) had been known since 1939—but only from mangled specimens dragged to the surface by nets. 

Photos © Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

10th March 2012

Link reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 87 notes

Gorilla genome analysis reveals new human links (as well as displacing a few chimp links) →

jtotheizzoe:

The gorilla genome sequence sheds light on traits such as hardened skin (tough knuckles), similar hearing and perception traits, and new insights into where chimps, gorillas and humans diverged on the primate tree.

Scientists, led by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute near Cambridge and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, also found that 15% of the gorilla’s genetic code is closer between humans and gorillas than it is between humans and chimpanzees, our closest animal relative. The genomes of all three species are, in any case, highly similar: humans and chimpanzees share more than 98% of their genes, while humans and gorillas share more than 96%


Previously: Gorillas and humans are not so far apart, as this terrifyingly beautiful moment of a man being groomed by wild gorillas demonstrates.

10th March 2012

Post reblogged from The Blog by Ziyad with 699 notes

The New Way Doctors Learn

ziyadmd:

A simple technique dramatically improved the memory recall of Harvard Medical School students. Try it for yourself!

Turning a medical student into a doctor takes a whole lot of knowledge. B. Price Kerfoot, an associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, was frustrated at how much knowledge his students seemed to forget over the course of their education. He suspected this was because they engaged in what he calls “binge and purge” learning: They stuffed themselves full of facts and then spewed them out at test time. Research in cognitive science shows that this is a very poor way to retain information, as Kerfoot discovered when he went looking in the academic literature for answers. But he also stumbled upon a method that really is effective, called spaced repetition. Kerfoot devised a simple digital tool to make engaging in spaced repetition almost effortless. In more than two dozen studies published over the past five years, he has demonstrated that spaced repetition works, increasing knowledge retention by up to 50 percent. And Kerfoot’s method is easily adapted by anyone who needs to learn and remember, not just those pursuing MDs.

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